U.S. Corps of Topographical Engineers

Topographical Engineer officer

General Regulations for the Army of the United States

Portions of the Regulations 
for the Years 1821, 1832, 1839, 1841, 1847, 1857, and 1863 
 Pertaining to the Dress and Duties of the 
Corps of Topographical Engineers

 

[NOTE: The 1839 Regulations is the complete text of a published General Order taken from the collections of the US Army Center of Military History.   The 1847 and 1861 Regulations are edited so only to include those portions pertaining to the Corps of Topographical Engineers so that uniform changes can be noted].

 

Note on photograph (left).  This photograph is taken from The Mexican War, a volume in the Old West series by Time-Life Books.  The uniform pieces are from the collections of the West Point Museum and bear several remarks.  The coat, trousers, and chapeau belonged to Captain George Hughes.  The Topographical Engineer saber has no name on the blade.  The belt is a dress belt from the pre-1839 dress regulations and in the strictest sense, does not belong to the uniform although these belts were frequently worn with the dress uniform. Finally, the sash should be tied on the right side rather than the left for the 1839-1851 period.

 

 

  • 1821 Regulations
  • 1832 Regulations
  • 1839 Regulations
  • 1847 Regulations
  • 1841 ARTICLE LXXV
  • 1851 Regulations
  • 1857 ARTICLE XLV
  • 1861 ARTICLE LI
  • 1863 ARTICLE XLVI

From, General Regulations For The Army; or Military Institutes (1821)

 

ARTICLE 65.


Uniforms.
1. Dark blue is the national colour. When a different one is not expressly prescribed, all uniform coats, whether for officers or enlisted men, will be of that colour.


Chapeaux de bras and caps.
2. Chapeaux de bras will be of the following form :— the fan not less than six and a half, nor more than nine inches deep in the rear, and not less than fifteen, nor more than seventeen and a half inches, from point to point; the edge bound round with black binding, an inch wide. Loop, button, and cockade, black; the latter four and a half inches in diameter, with a gold eagle in the centre; the eagle one and a half inch between the tips of the wings,
3. Caps of company officers will be of leather; bell crown; gilt scales; yellow eagle, in front, three inches between the tips of the wings, with the number of the regiment cut in the shield; black leather cockade, one and a half inch in diameter, having a small yellow button in the centre, with an eagle impressed on it. Those of the enlisted men will be of leather, and of the same form as those prescribed for officers; brass scales.
4. Chapeaux de bras will be worn by all officers in uniform, whether of the line or the staff, except company officers. Caps will be worn by all company officers when on duty with their companies, and by all enlisted men.

Plumes and Pompons.
5. No plumes nor pompons will be worn with chapeaux de bras.
6. The company officers of artillery will wear yellow pompons, five inches in length; those of the light artillery to be white, with red tops. The officers of infantry will wear similar pompons, except in colour, which shall be white; those of the light infantry companies to be yellow. The officers of rifle companies will wear like pompons, except in colour, which shall be green.
7. Yellow worsted pompons, five inches in length, will be worn by the enlisted men of the artillery; those of the light artillery to be white, with red tops. The enlisted men of the infantry will wear similar pompons, except in colour, which shall be white; those of the light infantry companies to be yellow. The enlisted men of the rifle companies will wear like pompons, except in colour, which shall be green.
8. Pompons will be worn in front of the cap.

Tassels for caps.
9. Those of the officers of the artillery and rifle companies will be of gold cord and bullion. Those of the officers of infantry will be of silver cord and bullion.
10. Those of the enlisted men of artillery will he of yellow worsted; those of the enlisted men of infantry will be of white worsted; and those of the enlisted men of tbe rifle corps will be of green worsted.

Stocks.
11. The stock will be of black leather, or silk; and nothing white shall be seen above it, round the neck, but the collar of the shirt.

Epaulettes.
12. Major generals and brigadier generals will wear two gold epaulettes. Those of the major general will have on the gold ground of each strap, two silver stars ; those of the brigadier general will have on each strap, one star. All other officers of the general staff will wear gold epaulettes, as follows:—colonels, lieutenant colonels, and majors, two; captains, one on the right shoulder, and subalterns, one on the left.
13. Colonels, lieutenant colonels, and majors, of engineers, artillery, and rifle, will wear two gold epaulettes. Colonels, lieutenant colonels, and majors, of infantry, will wear two silver epaulettes. Captains of engineers, one gold epaulette on the right shoulder, and subalterns one on the left.

Wings.
14. The wings of company officers of artillery and rifle will be of gold bullion. Those of company officers of infantry, of silver bullion.
15. The wings of the enlisted men of the artillery will be of yellow worsted; those of the enlisted men of infantry, of white worsted; and those of the enlisted men of rifle companies, of black worsted.

Chevrons.
16. Chevrons will designate rank as follows:—captains, one on each arm, above the elbow; and subalterns, one on each arm, below the elbow. They will be of gold or silver lace, half an inch wide, conforming in colour to the buttons of their regiments or corps. The angle of the chevron to point upwards.
17. Adjutants will be designated by an arc of gold or silver fringe, (according to the colour of their trimmings) connecting the extreme points formed by the two diverging lines of the chevron.
18. Sergeant majors and quartermaster sergeants will wear one chevron of worsted braid on each arm, above the elbow; sergeants and senior musicians, one on each arm, below the elbow; and corporals, one on the right arm, above the elbow. They will conform, in colour and material, to the braid with which the collars of their coats arc trimmed.

Coats.
19. The coat of the general staff will be single breasted, with one row of ten buttons, and with button-holes worked with blue twist in front, extending, at the top, to the seam of the sleeve, and not more than three inches long at the bottom. Standing collar to be united in front to the edge of the breast of the coat, not to rise higher than the tip of the ear, and always as high in front as the chin will permit, in turning the head. The cuffs not less than three and a half, nor more than four inches wide. The skirts faced with cloth of the same colour of the coat, the bottom of each not more than five, nor less than three and a half inches wide, the length to reach the bend of the knee—the bottom of the breast and two hip buttons to range. One blind button-hole, five inches long, with a button, on each side of the collar. The blind holes of the front of the coat, in the herring-bone form, to run in the same direction with the collar from the top to the bottom. Blind holes, in the like form, to proceed from four buttons placed lengthwise on each skirt. A gilt star on the bottom of the skirt, two inches from the lower edge. The cuffs to be indented, within one and a half inch of the edge, with four buttons lengthwise on each sleeve, and blind holes to the three upper buttons, corresponding with the indentation of the cuff, on the centre of which indentation is to be inserted the lower button.
20. The coat of the engineers to be single breasted, with one row of ten buttons in front; the button-holes of blue twist, in the herring-bone form, as those prescribed for the general staff. Standing collar of black silk velvet, to be united in front to the edge of the breast of the coat; not to rise higher than the tip of the ear, and always as high in front as the chin will permit, in turning the head.
The collar to be embroidered with a sprig of laurel encircling a star. The cuffs of black silk velvet, three and a half inches wide, to be indented, within one and a half inch of the edge, with three buttons lengthwise on each sleeve, at equal distances, the lower button to be placed on the centre of the indentation; blind holes of blue twist to proceed from the two top buttons in the herring-bone form, and corresponding with the indentation of the cuff. Three buttons, placed lengthwise on each skirt, with blind holes of blue twist, in the herring-bone form. The outer edge of the skirts faced with blue. Three buttons on the plait, one on a line with the hip, one within an inch of the bottom, and the other at the central point.
21. All general officers will be permitted to embroider their button-holes. Other officers of the general staff will be permitted to embroider the button-holes of the collar only.
22. The coat of medical officers shall correspond to that of the general staff, except in the collar and cuffs, which will be of black silk velvet. No embroidery is allowed them.

Coatee.
23. The coatee of the artillery will be single breasted, standing collar four inches wide, having two blind buttonholes on each side, of yellow lace for company officers, and yellow worsted binding for enlisted men, with a button at the termination of each hole; collar bound round with yellow lace, or braid; one row of ten buttons on the breast; button-holes of blue braid, in herring-bone form, length of the hole, for officers, as prescribed for the general staff. Cuff three inches wide, with four buttons round the upper edge, one inch apart; and blind holes of blue braid, from the buttons to the lower edge of the cuff. Pocket flaps one and a half inch wide, running across the hip on a line with the hip buttons, with four buttons under each; plait to have four buttons, one at the top on a line with the hip, another within one inch of the bottom of the skirt, and the two others one half inch on each side of the central point between the two extremities of the plait; blue braid down the tip and back part of the skirt. A diamond of blue cloth on the tip, bound round with lace or braid like that of the collar, the centre of which to be one and a half inch from the bottom of the skirt, and on a line with the lower button of the plait.
24; The coatee of the infantry will conform to that of the artillery, excepting that the former shall have white lace and braid where yellow is prescribed for the latter.
25. Field officers will wear coats in all respects conforming to the coatee of their regiment or corps, excepting that there will be but one blind button hole, of blue twist, five inches long, and one button on each side of the collar, and no lace. The skirts will extend to the bend of the knee, faced with blue like the general staff, and a diamond in lieu of a star.
26. The coatee of musicians will be of scarlet cloth.

Jackets.
27. The jacket for the riflemen will be of green cloth, hussar fashion, collar, body, back, seams, cuffs, and welts to be bound round with black silk braid for officers, and black worsted for the enlisted men; two blind buttonholes on each side of the collar, of black braid, terminating in crows-feet; and a button at the upper end of each hole. Three rows of nine buttons on the breast; buttonholes of black braid, a little circular in their form. Cuffs three and a half inches wide, to be indented within one and a half inch of the edge, with three buttons lengthwise on each sleeve, and blind holes to the two upper buttons, corresponding with the indentation of the cuff, on the centre of which indentation is to be inserted the lower button.

Vests.
28. The vests of the general staff, medical department, engineers, artillery, and rifle officers, will be buff, white, or blue. Those of the officers of infantry, white, or blue.
29. The waistcoats of the enlisted men of all corps, will be of white cotton drilling, with sleeves, for parade. For service, grey kersey jackets with sleeves, will be worn instead of vests.
30. All vests shall be single breasted, with one row of ten buttons, and without pocket flaps.

Pantaloons.
31. The pantaloons of the general staff, engineers, and medical officers, will be of buff, white, or blue. The pantaloons of all other commissioned officers, will be of white cassimere or other material for parade, and blue cloth for service. Pantaloons of company officers, for service, will correspond in colour with those of the men.
32. The enlisted men of artillery and infantry, for winter service, will wear grey woollen pantaloons of kersey, to be made wide, and reach to the ankle joint; for parade, white woollen, or cotton drilling pantaloons, conforming in size to the pantaloons prescribed for service.— The pantaloons of the enlisted riflemen will conform to these except in colour, which shall be green.
33. All pantaloons shall be plain, and without any show of metallic buttons, ornament, or trimming; and when worn over boots or bootees, shall be made wide and reach the ankle joint.

Swords and Belts.
34. The swords of the officers of the general staff, engineers, artillery, and rifle, will be yellow mounted, with a black or yellow gripe, and straight blades. Those of the officers of infantry will be of similar form, and will differ only in the colour of the mountings, which shall be white. Medical officers will wear yellow mounted small swords.
35. The general staff and engineers, will wear black waist belts, with a yellow plate. All other officers will wear white waist belts, one and a half inch wide. Artillery and rifle officers will wear on the belt a yellow oval plate, in front, one and a half inch wide, with an eagle in the centre. Those of the infantry will wear a similar plate, except in colour, which shall be white.

Sashes.
36. Red net silk sashes will be worn by all regimental and company officers on duty, to be tied with a knot in front of the right hip, so that the ends shall fall upon the right thigh.

Boots and Bootees.
57. High military boots will be worn by all officers mounted with marching troops, over the pantaloons. The officers of engineers will wear boots to reach the calf of the leg. Short boots will be worn by all other officers, (except those of engineers,) on all other occasions, under the pantaloons.
38. The enlisted men of all corps will wear, under the pantaloons, laced bootees, to extend four inches above the ankle joint.

Spurs.
39. Officers of the general staff will wear-yellow spurs. All other officers, entitled to forage, will wear yellow or white spurs, according to the colour of their buttons.

Buttons.
40. The general staff and medical officers will wear plain gilt bullet buttons.
41. The button of the engineers will be flat, of yellow metal, with only the device and motto heretofore established. The button of the artillery will be of yellow metal, cupped in form, three-fourths of an inch diameter, with an eagle impressed on it, and the letter "A." in the shield thereof. The rifle button, will be like that of the artillery, except that it will be more cupped, be only one half inch in diameter, and shall bear the letter "R." instead of "A." The button of the infantry will be like that of the artillery, except that it will be of white metal, and shall bear the letter "I." instead of "A."

General rules.
42. Company officers, off duty, are allowed uniforms in all respects like the field officers of their regiments or corps, with epaulettes instead of wings; captains, one on the right shoulder, and subalterns one on the left.
43. Officers doing the duty of aides-de-camp, are allowed to wear staff uniform, and epaulettes according to their rank.
44. Topographical engineers will be designated from the corps, only in the button; which shall be three-fourths of an inch diameter; flat; of yellow metal, with an appropriate device. Chaplains, judge advocates, commissaries of purchases, store-keepers, and paymasters, have no uniform.
45. On unofficial occasions, and in private societies, all officers of the army, are permitted to wear, with long coats, white pantaloons or breeches, with white silk stockings, and shoes. The breeches shall have knee buckles and buttons of the same colour with the buttons of the corps to which the officer belongs.
46. No undress uniform, or dresses resembling the military, without conforming to regulations, shall be worn; and all articles of uniform or equipment, more or less, than those prescribed, or in any manner differing from them, are prohibited. Officers shall at all times, except on occasions expressly reserved, be in the uniform here prescribed, or in a citizen's dress. All officers in uniform must wear swords.
47. Enlisted men of ordnance will wear artillery uniform.

ARTICLE 67.


Engineer Department.
1. The chief of the corps of engineers shall be stationed at the seat of government, and shall be charged with the superintendence of the corps of engineers, to which that of the topographical engineers is attached. He shall also be the inspector of the military academy, and be charged with its correspondence.
2. The duties of the engineer department will comprise the construction and repairs of fortifications, and a general superintendence and inspection of the same;—military reconnoitrings, embracing general surveys and examinations of the country, in a military point of view;—the surveys and examinations of particular sites for fortifications, and the formation of plans and estimates in detail for fortifications for the defence of the same, with such descriptive and military memoirs as may be necessary to establish the importance and capabilities of the position intended to be occupied;—the general direction of the disbursements on fortifications, including purchases of sites and materials, hiring workmen, purchases of books, maps, and instruments, and contracts for the supplies of materials and for workmanship.
3. There shall be detailed engineers to superintend the construction of fortifications, and as many assistants as may be deemed necessary.
4. Plans of the work which it is contemplated to construct, and such directions as may be thought necessary, will be transmitted to the superintending engineer, with an order to construct the work agreeably thereto; and the superintending engineer shall be held responsible for the faithful execution of the work agreeably to the plan.
5. An inspection of the materials shall be made by the engineer or assistant, as to quantity, quality, and price, at the time the materials are delivered. Upon this inspection, the materials may be received or rejected by the engineer ; but if received, an acknowledgment to that effect shall be endorsed by him upon the bills of parcels, which shall be the authority for the agent's disbursement.
6. When not otherwise directed, contracts may he made for carrying into effect the details of projects previously approved; but they must be reported to the chief engineer, accompanied by a certificate declaring them to have been made on the most reasonable terms that could be obtained.
7. There shall be appointed as many agents for fortifications as the service may require, who shall give bond for the faithful discharge of their duties.
8. They shall be governed by the orders of the engineer department, in the disbursement of the money placed in their hands; and by the following instructions in keeping and rendering their accounts:—
9. First. For articles purchased, hills of parcels, with fair and explicit receipts, must be taken.
10. Second. A roll of labourers, and another of mechanics, employed, must be made out, monthly, under the direction of the engineer or other officer superintending, in which each person's name must be inserted, the time he commenced and ended his services, the rate of wages per diem, and the whole amount due him, with his receipt for the same opposite thereto. If soldiers are employed, a separate roll must he made out for them, conformably to established regulations.
11. Third. The bills of parcels, and the rolls, must he certified by the engineer commanding,—the former, that the articles were received,—the latter, that the services were performed,—and both, that the articles and services were necessary for, and had been or were intended to be applied to, the objects for which they had been obtained.
12. Fourth. From those vouchers, abstracts are to be made, in which they are to be entered according to their respective dates, and numbered in regular progression:—
1. Abstract of articles purchased, to include all bills for articles purchased. 2. Abstract of labour performed, to include the rolls receipted for. 3. Abstract of pay of mechanics, to include all charges under that head. 4. Abstract of soldiers employed on extra duty, including all such. 5. Abstract of contingent expenses, to include all other expenditures, on account of fortifications, not above provided for. 6. These abstracts, with the vouchers, regularly numbered and filed, with each respectively, are to be forwarded for settlement, quarterly, within ten days after the termination of the quarter, to the chief engineer, to be passed to the auditor, accompanied by an account current, in which their respective amounts are to be entered to the debit of the United States, all moneys previously received to be credited, and the balance due to, or from, the United States to be stated.
13. As a general remark, it must be observed, that in all cases, the payments of the agents must be accompanied by the certificate of the engineer or officer superintending the fortifications: and, as much depends upon the correctness of the agents' accounts, it will be expected that the forms and instructions made known will be strictly adhered to.
14. Where there is no agent for fortifications, the superintending officer shall perform the duties of agent; and while performing such duties, the rules and regulations for the government of the agents shall be applicable to him; and, as compensation for the performance of that extra duty, he will be allowed, for moneys expended by him in the construction of fortifications, at the rate of two dollars per diem, during the continuance of such disbursements : provided the whole amount of emolument shall not exceed two and a half per cent, on the sum expended.
15. Funds, to be applied to the engineer department, will be advanced, monthly, on the requisition of the chief engineer, which must be founded on the estimate of the officer by whom, or under whose superintendence, they will be disbursed. The estimates to be in detail, so as to exhibit a full view of the intended operations for the month, with the expense attending the same; and to be accompanied by a statement of the disbursements of the preceding month, except in the months commencing quarters, when, instead thereof, the accounts of the previous quarter will be rendered for settlement.
16. All accounts relating to disbursements on account of the engineer department, before they be passed to the auditor for adjustment, must undergo a minute examination, as to prices, and the object and character of the disbursements, by the chief engineer, who, to be prepared for such examination, must keep himself always informed of the current value, at the several points at which disbursements are made, of the materials, labour, and workmanship, that may be required at each of those points respectively : and the chief engineer shall endorse his approval on such accounts as meet his approbation, and note his objections on the others, which will be returned for farther explanation.
17. The agents must make their payments in the money received by them from government, or, if they receive drafts, in the notes of the banks on which the same shall be drawn, or in specie: and they shall make their deposits, and transact their business, at such bank as shall be designated to them.
18. When property is not accounted for, nor its loss satisfactorily explained, the officer to whom the care of it had been confided, will be charged with the value of the same.
19. Besides occasional inspections, which may at all times be ordered by the chief engineer, all fortifications, when reported by the superintending engineer to be completed, shall undergo a thorough and minute inspection, by officers of the corps of engineers to be designated for that purpose, who shall be furnished with the plans, a summary of the cost under each head, and such other information as may be necessary; and shall report their opinions as to the manner in which the work has been executed.
20. No work, until completed and inspected, shall be occupied by troops, unless by the special order of the war department.
21. The functions of the engineers being generally confined to the most elevated branch of military science, they are not to assume, nor are they subject to be ordered on, any duty beyond the line of their immediate profession, except by special authority through the war department; (see Art. 38, par. 2.) and when so arranged to other duties, either on detachment or otherwise, they will have precedence according to their commissions, which at all times entitle them to every mark of military respect. See 63d Art. of war.
22. Whenever an officer of engineers is sent to any military department, fortress, garrison, or post, a duplicate of his orders will be sent to the commanding officer. On his arrival, the engineer shall communicate his orders, and will receive the necessary facilities for the accomplishment of the same, from the commanding officer. While so on duty, without being specially put under the direction of the commanding officer, the senior engineer present will be furnished with copies of all orders and regulations of the command, relative to etiquette and police, and will be regularly served with the countersign of the post or garrison, when quartered within the chain of sentinels. (See Art. 48, par. 11.) When leaving the limits of the department or command, under orders, the engineer will report the same to the commandant.
23. An officer of the topographical engineers shall be stationed at Washington, who, besides performing such topographical duties as may be assigned to him, shall be charged, under the chief engineer, with the safe keeping and preservation of the books, instruments, charts, maps, plans, surveys, topographical reports, descriptive and military memoirs, &c. belonging to the engineer department, and who shall be responsible, not only for their good preservation, but for their arrangement, which shall be such as to admit of the most ready reference.
24. All officers of the corps, and topographical engineers, who may be in possession of books, instruments, charts, maps, &c. belonging to the engineer department, shall render to the topographical office quarterly returns of the same, according to such forms as may be prescribed, and shall, while in their possession, be responsible for them. When the objects for which the books, instruments, charts, maps, &c. were put into the hands of an officer, shall be completed, he shall report the same to the topographical office, and hold them subject to its order.
25. Officers of the corps of engineers, and topographical engineers,^ while exploring, reconnoitring, or surveying, if they have not received transportation and quarters for the time, will be allowed, while they are actually engaged, at the rate of one dollar and fifty cents per diem.
26. For the regulations of the military academy, which is under this department, see Art. 78.

 

1832 Uniform Regulations

...Topographical Engineers

Coat--dark blue cloth, single breasted, with one row of ten buttons; stand up collar united in front at the lower edge, and so high that the chin may pass freely over it; cuffs oblique, three and a half inches wide on the upper, and two inches on the lower seam of the sleeve; the skirt to come to the bend of the knee; outer edge of the skirt faced with cloth of the same color as the coat; one button at the top, and one within an inch and a half of the bottom of each plait, which will be composed of a single fold; the collar, cuffs, turnbacks, and the top of the plaits, between the hip buttons, ornamented with oak leaf and acorn embroidery in gold.

Epaulettes--according to rank, as hereafter described.

Buttons--gilt, seven eights of an inch diameter, slightly convex: device, the shield of the United States, occupying one half of the diameter: letters T.E. In Old English characters, occupying the other half; small buttons, one half inch diameter: device the same.

Hat-- cocked without binding; fan or back part eleven inches; the front or cock, nine inches; each corner, six inches; black ribbons on the two front sides.

Loop and cockade--black silk cockade, six inches diameter; loop gold 11 inches long, ornamented with a gilt spread eagle.

Tassels--gold.

Cravat or stock--black silk.

Sword knot--gold lace strap, with gold bullion tassel.

Boots--ankle or Jefferson.

Spurs--yellow metal or gilt.

Trousers-- from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton

Plume--black swan feathers, drooping from an upright stem, feathered to the length of eight inches.

Sword--small sword, three cornered; gilt hilt, and mountings; black scabbard.

Sword-belt--black waist belt, two inches wide, worn under the coat; with a sliding frog.

Plate--gilt, elliptical, two inches in the shortest diameter, bearing the device of the button.

Frock coat--dark blue cloth, single breasted, with stand up cloth collar; cloth cuffs; regulation button; one row of nine buttons on the breast.

Cloak--dark blue cloth lined with same.

Epaulettes
Of a Colonel--bright bullion, half an inch diameter; three inches and a half long; plain lace strap, ornamented with an embroidered spread eagle; crescent solid; eagle to be silver where the bullion is gold.
Of a Lieutenant Colonel--the same as the Colonel, omitting the eagle.
Of a Major--the same as a Lieutenant Colonel as to shape and size; the strap to be of silver lace, where the bullion is gold.
Of a Captain--plain lace straps and solid crescent; bullion smaller than that of a Major's, and two and a half inches deep.
Of a Lieutenant--the same as for a Captain, except that the bullion is smaller.

The bullion of all epaulettes to correspond in colour with the button of the coat.
All officers having military rank, to wear one epaulette on each shoulder.
Epaulettes may be worn either with pads or boxes.

Aiguillettes
Staff officers, general, as well as regimental, except the Topographical Engineers, will be distinguished by aiguillettes.

1839 Regulations pertaining to Dress 
 

 

 


REGULATIONS 
FOR THE 
UNIFORM AND DRESS 
OF THE 
ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 
  
  
  
 

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, 
Washington, June, 1839. 
J. Gideon, junr. Printer.

 

 


GENERAL ORDERS No. 36, HEAD QUARTERS OF THE ARMY

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE

Washington, June 21,1839 
  
 

The following description of the DRESS of the Army of the United States is published for the information and guidance of all concerned, and is to be strictly conformed to by the Army. Colonels of regiments and corps will see that the uniform is worn by the officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of their respective corps; and general and other officers, not of the line of the army, and whose duty it is to inspect the troops, will notice every deviation from the prescribed dress, and oblige the individuals concerned to rectify the same forthwith. Every departure from the established dress will be considered as disobedience of orders, subjecting the conduct of individuals so offending to the decision and sentence of a court martial.

BY ORDER OF ALEXANDER MACOMB,

Major General, Commanding in Chief:

s/Th[omas] Jones

Adj[utan]t Gen[era]l

 


UNIFORM, AND DRESS OF THE ARMY 
OF THE 
UNITED STATES.


The Major General Commanding the Army.

DRESS.

Coat—dark blue, double-breasted; two rows of buttons, eight in each row, at equal distances: the distance between the rows, four inches at top, and three at bottom; stand up collar, to meet and hook in front, and no higher than the chin; cuffs two and a half inches deep, to go round the sleeve, parallel with the lower edge, and to button with three small buttons at the under seam; pointed cross flaps to the skirts, with four buttons equally distributed; the skirts to reach to the bend of the knee, with buff kersimere turnbacks; the bottom of the skirts, not less than three and a half, nor more than five inches broad, with a gold embroidered star on buff cloth three and a half inches diameter by three inches, the longest point perpendicular at the connecting point of the buff on each skirt; two hip buttons, to range with the lower buttons on the breast: collar, cuffs, and facings, of buff cloth or kersimere; lining buff. The cuffs, collar, and cross flaps may, at the option of the General, be embroidered with the oak leaf in gold, in which ease the collar and cuffs will be of blue cloth instead of buff.

Epaulettes—gold, with solid crescent; device, three silver embroidered stars, one 11 inch in diameter, one 13 inch, and one l7 inch, placed on the strap, in a row longitudinally, and equi-distant; the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the top; dead and bright gold bullion.

Buttons—gilt, convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain border.

Hat—cocked without binding; fan or back part not more than eleven inches, nor less than nine inches; the front or cock not more than nine inches, nor less than eight inches; each corner, six inches; black ribbons on the two front sides.

Loop and cockade—black silk cockade; loop gold, eleven inches long, ornamented with a silver spread eagle; gold rays emanating from the eagle 21 inches, computing from the centre, terminating in 24 silver stars, plain or set with brilliants.

Tassels—gold, with worked hangers.

Plume—yellow swan feathers, drooping from an upright stem, feathered to the length of eight inches.

Cravat or stock—black silk.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, with a buff or gold lace stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide and welted at the edges; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, plain white linen or cotton.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

Spur—yellow metal or gilt.

Sword and Scabbard—straight sword, gilt hilt, silver grip, brass or steel scabbard.

Sword-knot—gold cord with acorn end.

Sword-belt—Russian leather, with three stripes of gold embroidery; the carriages to be embroidered on both sides; the belt to be worn over the coat.

Plate—gilt, having the letters U. S. and a sprig of laurel on each side in silver.

Sash—buff, silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twice around the waist and to tie on the left hip. The sash may be made of silk and gold mixed, at the option of the general.

Gloves—buff or white. 

UNDRESS.

Coat—plain, dark blue, standing collar, buttons same as full dress, with two in the centre and one at the termination of each fold; without the buff and turnbacks.

Epaulettes, Buttons, Hat Loop and cockade, Tassels, Plume, Cravat or stock, Boots, Spurs, Sword and scabbard, Sword knot, Belt (black patent leather), Plate, Sash, Gloves -- The same as in DRESS uniform.

Trousers—the same as in DRESS uniform, but without the stripe.

Forage Cap—according to pattern in Clothing Bureau.

 All other Majors General.

DRESS AND UNDRESS.

The same as for the major general commanding the army, excepting that the nine buttons on the breast of the coat are to be placed by threes.

Epaulettes—the same, excepting that there shall be two stars on the straps, instead of three.

Plume—the same form and materials, excepting that it will be black and white, the black tip half the length.

Brigadier General.

DRESS AND UNDRESS.

The same as for a major general, excepting that the coat is to have ten buttons placed on the breast, in pairs.

Epaulettes—the same, excepting that there shall be one star on the straps, instead of two.

Plume—the same as to materials and form, excepting that it will be white and red, the white tip half the length.

Frock coat for general officers—blue cloth; two rows of buttons, placed according to rank, as on the dress coat; stand-up collar of dark blue velvet; cuffs also of blue velvet; lining, black silk, or blue cloth; pockets in the folds of the skirt, with one button at the hip and one at the end of each pocket; making only four buttons on the back and skirts of the coat.

Officers of the General Staff.

DRESS.

Officers of the general staff, having rank as such, and below the rank of generals, will wear a uniform coat corresponding with that of the generals, excepting that it will be single breasted, with a row of nine buttons placed at equal distances; the collar to be part buff; the buff to extend four inches on each side from the front; the rest of the collar blue; the cuffs also blue.

Epaulettes—according to rank, as hereafter described.

Buttons—gilt, convex, same as general officers.

Hat—cocked, the same as that for general officers.

Loop and cockade—same as that for generals, omitting the rays and stars; the eagle to be gilt instead of silver.

Tassels—gold.

Plume—swan feathers, the same as the general officers, with the distinction of colors to designate the departments of the staff, as hereafter described.

Sword-knot—gold lace strap, with gold bullion tassel.

Cravat or stock, Trousers, Boots, Spurs, Sword and steel scabbard, Plate, Gloves, Sash (red silk net work, silk bullion fringe ends) The same as for general officers.

Sword-belt—Russia leather, with two stripes of gold embroidery; carriages embroidered on one side only. 

UNDRESS.

Coat—as prescribed for DRESS; but without the buff, and turnbacks.

Trousers—as prescribed for DRESS; but without the stripe.

Epaulettes, Buttons, Hat Loop and cockade, Tassels, Plume, Cravat or stock, Boots, Spurs, Sword and scabbard, Sword knot, Belt (black patent leather), Plate, Sash, Gloves -- The same as in DRESS uniform.

Forage cap—according topattern in clothing bureau.

Frock coat for staff officers under the rank of general officers—dark blue cloth, single breasted, with stand up cloth collar; cloth cuffs; regulation button; one row of eight buttons on the breast; lining and buttons on the skirt same as general officers.

Cloak for general and staff officers—bluecloth, lined with buff, or blue.

Plumes for the different departments of the staff.

Adjutant general's—white.

Inspector general's—green.

Quartermaster's—light blue.

Subsistence—light blue and white, blue tip half the length.

Aides-de-camp, and officers attached to generals, the same plume as worn by their generals, only an inch shorter. These plumes to be of the same material and form as prescribed for the general-commanding-the army.

Aides-de-camp

May wear the uniform of the general staff, according to rank, or that of their corps, at their option, the plume being the distinctive mark

Pay Department.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double breasted; two rows of buttons, ten buttons in each row; the rows to commence at the collar and to run in right lines to the bottoms of the lapels; four inches apart at the top, and two and a half inches at the bottom; the buttons in each row to be equidistant; standing collar of blue cloth; skirts to be made after the fashion of a plain coat, and lined with blue cloth, with a button at each hip; one at the end ofeach fold, and one intermediate in each fold; the paymaster-general to have two gold embroidered button holes on each end of the collar; paymasters, one on each end

Buttons—same as for other officers of the general staff.

Hat—cocked, plain, of the same form and dimensions as prescribed for general officers; black button and black silk gimp loop formed like that of the general officers; no tassel or other ornament except the cockade and gilt eagle.

Sword—small sword, gilt hilt and mountings; black scabbard and belt; plate same as for general staff.

Sword-knot—gold.

Stock or cravat—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

Spurs—gilt.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, from the 1st ofMay to the 30th September, white linen or cotton.

Frock coat and cloak—same as for other officers of the general staff, except the lining of the cloak, which will be blue.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Medical Department.

Coat—same as for the Pay department, except that the collar will be of black velvet. Surgeon-general to have two gold embroidered button holes on each side of the collar; surgeons, one on each end; the collar of assistant surgeons to be without ornament.

Buttons, Hat, &c., Sword, belt and plate, Sword knot, Stock or cravat, Gloves, Spurs, Boots, Frock coat and cloak, Same as for the Pay department.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth with a black cloth stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Corps of Engineers.

Coat—dark blue, single breasted, one row of nine buttons placed at equal distances; stand-up collar of black velvet, gold embroidered wreath on each side, near the front, of laurel and palm, crossing each other at the bottom, encircling a star of gold embroidery; cuffs, according to design in Engineer department; the skirt plain; one button at each hip; one at the end of the skirt, and one intermediate, between the hip and skirt buttons.

Epaulettes—gold, according to rank, as hereafter described.

Buttons—the same as now established.

Hat—the same as that described for the general officers.

Loop and cockade—same as for general staff.

Tassels—gold.

Plume—three black ostrich feathers.

Cravat or stock—black silk.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue, with a black velvet stripe down the outer seam one and a half inch wide; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Boots, Spurs, Sword-knot, Sword-belt -- Same as for general staff.

Sword—gilt hilt, black scabbard with gilt mountings.

Plate—gilt, according to pattern in Engineer department.

Frock coat and cloak—the same as for the general staff, excepting the button, which will be that of the corps; the cloak lined with blue.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Military Academy.
Professors, Teachers, and their assistants, not in the line of the army, including the Sword-master:—

Coat—plain, blue cloth, with buttons of the corps of engineers.

Hat—round, with black cockade, and yellow eagle.

Sword and belt—like that prescribed for the Pay department.

Frock coat, cloak, and forage cap—Same as for engineers.

Chaplain.

Coat—plain, black cloth, with buttons of the corps of engineers.

Hat, sword and beltsame as above.

Frock coat, cloak, and forage cap—Same as for engineers.

Cadets.

According to patterns in the Engineer department.

Corps of Topographical Engineers.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double-breasted, two parallel rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances; the distance between the rows four inches throughout, measuring from the centres or eyes of the buttons; standing collar, to meet with hooks and eyes, and to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it; square cuff, three and one-fourth inches deep; slashed flap on the skirt, of dark blue cloth, seven and one-fourth inches long, and three and one-tenth inches wide at the upper and lower edges, with three large buttons, one at each point; two large buttons at the waist; the skirt to extend within three and a half inches of the bend of the knee; the collar, cuffs, and skirt facings or turn-backs, to be of dark blue velvet; the collar, cuffs, and slashed skirt flaps to be embroidered in gold, with oak leaves and acorns, according to the designs in the Topographical Bureau. Rank to be designated by galloons of gold lace, half an inch wide, placed diagonally and entirely across the upper side of the sleeve just above the cuff, and below the elbow, as follows, viz.: For a second lieutenant, one galloon on each sleeve; for a first lieutenant, two galloons on each sleeve; for a captain, three galloons on each sleeve; for a field officer, four galloons on each sleeve.

Graduates of the Military Academy, attached to the corps, with the rank of second lieutenant by brevet, will not wear galloons, but in all other respects they will dress as the second lieutenants.

Epau1ettes—according to rank, as described hereafter; within the crescent, which will be solid and bright, a shield embroidered in gold, and below it the letters  T.E. in old English characters; the letters to be of silver for all grades, except the majors, who will wear yellow letters, to form the contrast with their epaulette straps of silver lace. The spread eagle, of silver, to be worn by the colonel only, is to be placed upon the epaulette strap above the shield.

Buttons—gilt, seven-eighths of an inch diameter in the extreme, convex and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the letters  T.E.. in old English characters, occupying the other half; small buttons one-half inch diameter, device and form the same.

Hat, loop and cockade, tassels, stock or cravat, sword-knot, boots, gloves—the same as for officers of the general staff, except that the button in front of the hat will be that of the corps.

Plume—black, of the same form and materials as for the General Staff.

Sash—crimson silk-net, with silk bullion fringe ends, to go twice round the waist, and to be tied on the right hip; the pendant part to extend uniformly one foot two inches below the tie.

Spurs—yellow metal, straight shank, to correspond with the design in the Topographical Bureau.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, with a gold stripe down the outer seam for full dress, one and three-fourths inch wide, to correspond with the pattern in the Topographical Bureau; from the 1st of May until the 30th September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Sabre—of same form as that prescribed for the dragoons; fish-skin gripe, bound with yellow wire; gilt hilt, of half basket form; bright steel scabbard, to correspond with the pattern to be deposited in the Topographical Bureau.

Waist-belt—black, one and a half inch wide, like that of the dragoons.

Plate—gilt, elliptical, two inches in the shortest diameter; device, the eagle and shield of the United States, and the letters  U.S. in old English characters underneath, with the words CORPS OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS, in small Roman capitals, around the edge of the plate.

Frock coat—same as for the general staff, except that the buttons will be those of the corps, and ten in front. With the frock coat, or for undress, the stripes on the trousers will be of black silk and worsted lace, with oak leaf and acorn figure, and one and three-fourth inch wide.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Cloak—same as for the general staff, except the button; lining blue.

 Artillery.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double breasted, two rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances; the distance between the rows four inches at top, and two inches at bottom, measuring from the centres or eyes of the buttons; standing collar, to meet in front with hooks and eyes, and rise no higher than to permit the free turning of the chin over it; two loops, four and a half inches long, on each side of the collar, with one small uniform button at the end of each loop; the collar edged all round with red; plain round cuff, three inches deep; slashed flap on the sleeve, six and a half inches long, and two and two-eighths of an inch wide at the points, and two inches wide at the narrowest part of the curve; four loops and four small buttons on the slashed flap on the sleeve for field officers; for captains, a sleeve of the same pattern, but the slash only four and a half inches long, with three loops, and three small buttons; and for subalterns, a slash sleeve of three and a half inches long, with two loops, and two small buttons; loops to be placed at equal distances; slashed flap on the skirt, with four loops and large buttons; the slashed flaps on the sleeves and skirt to be edged with red on the ends and indented edge; two large buttons at the waist; skirt to extend to within three and a half inches of the bend of the knee; red kerseymere turnbacks and skirt linings; gold embroidered shell and flame at the bottom of the skirt; loops on the collar and flaps to be of gold lace, half an inch wide, and the entire loop not to exceed one and a quarter inch in breadth; the coat to be lined with red.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Buttons—gilt, convex; seven-eighths of an inch in diameter; device, a spread eagle with shield, bearing the letter A.

Cap—black beaver, seven and a half inches deep, with lackered sunk tip seven and a half inches diameter, with a band of black patent leather to encircle the bottom of the cap; black patent leather peak, gilt eagle, and cross cannons and number of regiment; a strap of black patent leather, fastened to each side of the cap, to be worn under the chin.

Plume—red cock feathers falling from an upright stem, eight inches long, with a gilt socket. Officers of the horse artillery will be allowed to wear a red horse-hair plume, instead of a cock-feather.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, white and light blue mixture cloth, producing the effect of a sky-blue, to come well down over the boots, and made perfectly plain, except a red stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide, and welted at the edges from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, without the stripe.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

Spurs—(for mounted officers) yellow metal or gilt.

Sword and Scabbard—according to pattern furnished by the Ordnance department.

Sword-knot—crimson and gold, with bullion tassel.

Shoulder-belt—whiteleather, two and a half inches wide, with frog; to be worn over the coat, with a breast plate, according to pattern to be furnished by the Ordnance department. The colonel, lieutenant colonel, major, and adjutant of a regiment will wear a waist belt of the pattern now used.

Sash—crimson silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twice round the waist and to be tied on the left hip; the pendant part to be uniformly one foot in length from the tie.

Stock—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Frock coat—dark blue cloth, single breasted; with not less than eight nor more than ten (depending on the size of the officer) large regimental buttons down the front at equal distances, and two small regimental buttons at the fastening of the cuff; plain stand up collar; two large buttons at each pocket in the skirt, one of which at the hip, and the other at the bottom of the fold of the pocket, making four buttons behind; lining of the coat, blue.

Cloak—blue, lined with scarlet shalloon; walking length; clasp ornaments at bottom of collar, gilt eagle, with chain.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

 Ordnance Department.

Coat—of the same pattern as the artillery; to be of dark blue cloth throughout; no red; lace, the same as the artillery.

Buttons—gilt, convex, plain border, cross cannon and bomb-shell.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Hat—cocked, and ornaments the same as the general staff.

Plume—the same as the artillery.

Trousers—of dark blue cloth, with stripe one and a half inch wide of the same material and color, welted at the edges; plain while linen or cotton for summer.

Boots, Spurs for mounted officers, Sword and scabbard, Waist-belt, Plate, Sword-knot, Sash, Stock, Gloves, Frock coat, Cloak, Same as for the artillery, except that the sword belt will be of black patent leather, and worn round the waist.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Ordnance sergeants to wear the uniform of the sergeant-major of artillery, except the aiguillette, and stripe of the cloth pantaloons, which will be dark blue instead of red. Ordnance men the same as the artillery, except the shoulder straps, which will be red.

Infantry.

Coat—the same pattern as that of the artillery; to be of dark blue cloth, lined with white serge; edged with white kerseymere where the artillery coat is edged with red; turnbacks and skirt lining of white kerseymere; skirt ornament silver embroidered bugle; the lace to be silver.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Buttons—same as at present worn.

Cap—same as the artillery, except the ornaments, which are a silver bugle, number of regiment, surmounted by a gilt eagle, as at present worn.

Plume—white cock-feathers, falling from an upright stem, eight inches long, with a gilt socket.

Trousers—the same as the artillery, except that the stripe on the mixture trousers to be of white kerseymere.

Boots, Spurs for mounted officers, Sword and scabbard, Sword-knot, Shoulder-belt and plate, Sash, Stock, Gloves, Same as for the artillery.

Frock coat—same as for the artillery, except the button, which will be the regimental button.

Cloak—same as for the artillery, except the lining, which will be white shalloon.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

 Dragoons.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double-breasted, two rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances, after the fashion of the coat described for the infantry; the lace gold; the collar, cuffs, and turnbacks, yellow, the skirt to be ornamented with a star instead of a bugle, and the length of the skirt to be what is called three-quarters; the slash flap on the skirt and sleeve to correspond with that of the infantry; the slash on the sleeve to designate rank in the same manner; the collar to be framed with lace, two loops on each side of the collar, with small uniform buttons at the back end of the loops.

Epaulettes—according to the established rule, where the button is yellow, and according to rank.

Button—gilt, convex, device, a spread eagle, with the letter D on the shield.

Trousers—for the company officers, blue grey mixture, of the same color as that for the infantry, with two stripes of yellow cloth, three-fourths of an inch wide, up each outward seam, leaving a light of 3 inch between.

For the colonel, lieutenant colonel, major, and adjutant, dark blue cloth, with two stripes of gold lace up each outward seam, three-fourths of an inch wide, leaving a light between. For the summer, all officers to wear plain white drilling.

Cap—of the same material as that for the infantry, but according to a pattern furnished; to be ornamented with a gilt star, silver eagle, and gold cord; the star to be worn in front, with a drooping white horse hair pompon; the field officers to have a small strip of red hair, to show in front of their pompons.

Boots—ankle.

Spurs—yellow metal.

Sabre—browned steel scabbard, half basket hilt, gilt, with two fluted bars on the outside, fish-skin gripe, bound with silver wire, and of the pattern deposited with the Ordnance department.

Sword-knot—gold cord, with acorn end.

Waist-belt—black patent leather, one and a half inch wide, with slings, hooks, and plate, like those of the general staff, omitting on the plate the letters U.S. and inserting the letter D within the wreath.

Sash—silk net, deep orange color, and like that of the infantry, as to shape and size; to be tied on the right hip; to be worn only when in full dress, and with the frock coat.

Stock—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Frock coat—dark blue cloth, cut after the fashion of that described for the artillery. Officers upon ordinary stable duty, marches, or active service, will be permitted to wear a shell or stable jacket, corresponding with that of the men, with gold lace trimmings.

Great coat—blue grey mixture, like that furnished the men, double-breasted, with sleeves, stand-up collar, cape to meet, and button all the way in front, and reach down to the upper edge of the cuff of the coat.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Horse Furniture, for Dragoons.

Housing—blue cloth, with gold lace border, for the field officers and commissioned staff, one and a half inch wide, and yellow cloth border of the same width, for company officers.

Bridle—black leather.

Mountings—all metallic mountings, stirrups, bits, &c., of saddle and bridle, to be of yellow metal.

Non-commissioned Officers, Buglers, and Privates of Dragoons.

Coat—dark blue cloth short coat, double-breasted, with yellow collar, cuffs, turnbacks, and brass shoulder-knots, of the exact cut and fashion of the one furnished the clothing bureau. Sergeants to wear chevrons of three bars, points towards the cuff, on each sleeve, above the elbow; corporals, two bars. The collar of the chief musicians' and sergeants' coats to be trimmed with yellow worsted binding, after the style of the officers. Musicians' coats to be of red cloth, yellow turnbacks and cuffs, yellow buttons

Trousers—same material as for other corps, but cut and made after the style and fashion of a pair furnished the clothing bureau. Sergeants to have two yellow stripes three-fourths of an inch wide, up each outward seam, leaving a light of 3 inch between. Corporals and privates one yellow stripe up each outward seam. The stripes to be in advance of the seam.

Jacket—blue cloth for winter, white cotton for summer; stand-up collar, trimmed with yellow worsted binding, like a sergeant's coat; single-breasted, one row of buttons in front. These jackets are to be made of cloth of the quality used for the old uniform coats.

Cap—same materials as for other corps; but the pattern, ornaments, and trimming, like the one furnished the clothing bureau; drooping white horse hair pompon.

Great coat—same materials as for other corps. Stand-up collar, double-breasted, cape to reach down to the cuff of the coat, and to button all the way up.

Boots—ankle.

Spurs—yellow metal.

The non-commissioned staff to wear aiguillettes on the left shoulder, like those for the artillery. Non-commissioned staff and first sergeants of companies wear yellow worsted sashes.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

 Civil Staff.
Commissary General of purchases, Military storekeepers, Ordnance storekeepers.

Coat—plain, of blue cloth.

Button—of the department to which the officers respectively belong; if to no particular arm, the general staff button.

Trousers—plain blue cloth for winter, and plain white linen or cotton for summer.

Round hat, black cockade, and yellow eagle.

Sword and belt—same as for Pay department.

Forage cap—same as worn by officers of the department.

Frock coat—same as the general staff; single breasted; button of department; without straps.

Badges to Distinguish Rank.

EPAULETTES.

Of general officers—as above described.

Of a colonel—bright bullion, half an inch diameter, three inches and a half long; plain lace strap, ornamented with an embroidered spread eagle; the number of the regiment to be embroidered within the crescent; crescent solid; eagle and number to be silver where the bullion is gold and gold where the bullion is silver.

Of a lieutenant colonel—the same as the colonel, omitting the eagle.

Of a major—the same as a lieutenant colonel as to shape and size; the strap to be of silver lace where the bullion is gold, and of gold lace where the bullion is silver; the number on the strap to correspond in color with the bullion, the border of the strap the same color of the bullion.

Of a captain—plain lace straps and solid crescent; bullion one-fourth inch diameter and two and a half inches deep; regimental number on the strap to be gold embroidered where the bullion is silver, and to be silver embroidered where the bullion is gold.

Of a lieutenant—the same as for a captain, except that the bullion is one-eighth inch in diameter.

The bullion of all epaulettes to correspond in color with the button of the coat.

All officers having military rank, to wear one epaulette on each shoulder.

The number on the strap of the epaulette being intended to denote the regiment, will he worn by regimental officers only.

Epaulettes may be worn either with pads or boxes.

AIGUILLETTES.

Staff officers, general as well as regimental, except the engineers, topographical engineers, and ordnance, will be distinguished by aiguillettes.

Aiguillettes of general staff officers—twisted gold cord, with gilt engraved tags, worn on the right shoulder, under the epaulette.

The general staff is to include—

The officers of the Adjutant-general's department, 
The Inspectors general, 
The Aides-de-camp, 
The officers of the Quartermaster's department, 
The officers of the Subsistence department. 
The officers of the Pay department, 
The officers of the Medical department.

Aiguillettes of regimental staff officers—twisted gold and silver cord, with gilt tags, worn under the epaulettes of the right shoulder.

SHOULDER STRAPS.

To be worn on the frock coats of general, general staff, artillery and infantry officers.

The Major General Commanding the Army—strap of blue cloth, one inch in breadth, and not less than three and a half inches nor more than four inches in length; bordered with an embroidery of gold a quarter of an inch wide; three silver embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side, equidistant between the centre and outer edge of the strap. The centre star to be the largest; where these stars would come in contact with the embroidery of the strap, there must be described an arc of a circle, (having the centre of the star for its centre, and the radius of the star for its radius,) taking out a sufficient quantity of the embroider to admit them.

A Major General—the same as the Major General commanding the army, except that there will be two stars instead of three; the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both stars of the same size.

A Brigadier General—the same as a major general, except that there will be one star instead of two; the centre of the star to be equi-distant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of the strap.

A Colonel—strap of the same size as above; the embroidery on the border to be one half the width (i. e. one eighth of an inch;) an embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap two inches between the tips of the wings, having in the right talon an olive branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast as represented in the arms of the United States; the embroidery of the eagle to be of silver where the border is gold, and of gold where the border is silver.

A Lieutenant Colonel—the same as for a colonel, omitting the eagle, and introducing a leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap; the embroidered leaf of the same color with the border.

Major—the same as that for a lieutenant colonel, except that the leaves will be of silver where the border is of gold, and of gold where the border is of silver.

A Captain—the same as that for a major, except that two embroidered bars will be substituted for each leaf, of the same width and color as the border; to be placed parallel to the ends of the strap; the distance between them and from the border equal to the width of the border.

A First Lieutenant—the same as for a captain, excepting that there will be one bar at each end instead of two.

A Second Lieutenant—the same as for a first lieutenant, omitting the bars.

Note.—The embroidery of the borders of the straps is, in every instance, to correspond in color to the button of the coat.

Shoulder straps for dragoons.

Formed like the strap of the epaulette, and made of blue cloth, edged with gold lace like an epaulette; solid gilt crescent, with the number of regiment embroidered within. The strap of the colonel to have on it a silver embroidered eagle; that of the lieutenant colonel two gold leaves at the points, where the crescent joins it; that of the major two silver leaves; that of the captain two gold bars; that of the first lieutenant one bar; that of the second lieutenant plain. [see Note 1]

Horse Furniture for General and Staff Officers.

Housing for general officers—of dark blue cloth, trimmed with two rows of gold lace, the outer row one inch and five-eighths wide; the inner row two inches and a quarter; to be worn over the saddle; made full, so as to cover the horse's haunches, and fore-hands, and to bear certain embroidered ornaments, to denote the rank of the officer.

The housing of the major general commanding the army to be denoted by a gold embroidered spread eagle and three stars.
---of all other majors general, by a gold embroidered spread eagle and two stars.
---of a brigadier general, by a gold embroidered spread eagle and one star.

Surcingle—of blue web, to be attached to the housing. The same as the above for all staff officers holding the rank of general officers, according to their grade; if under that rank, they are to use the saddle-cloth prescribed for staff officers, to wit:

Saddle-cloth for staff officers—dark blue, of sufficient length to cover the saddle and holsters, and one foot ten inches in depth, with an edging of gold lace; the width of the lace one inch.

Bridle—of black leather; bent branch-bit, with gilt bosses; the front and roses yellow.

Collar—yellow.

Holsters—black leather, with gilt mountings.

Stirrups—gilt.

Officers of engineers and topographical engineers, the same as above, according to rank.

Horse Furniture for mounted officers of Artillery, Ordnance, and Infantry.

Saddle cloth—dark blue, two feet ten inches in length, and one foot ten inches in depth, with lace five-eighths of an inch in width; for the artillery and ordnance, gold lace; scarlet edging for the artillery; dark blue for the ordnance; for the infantry, silver lace and white edging.

Bridle—of black leather; gilt bits, stirrups, and mountings, for the artillery and ordnance, and plated for the infantry; front and roses for the artillery, red; for the ordnance, blue; for the infantry, white.

Collar—for the artillery, red; for the ordnance, blue; for the infantry, white.

Holsters—to be covered with black bear-skin, or leather.

General, and General Staff Officers.

The DRESS uniform of generals and general staff officers is to be worn at dress reviews, and on extraordinary occasions.

The UNDRESS is for general use, and may be worn on all occasions not specified above.

The blue frock coat may be worn by general officers on common occasions off parade, and when the troops are ordered to wear their great coats upon a march; to be worn buttoned, and hooked at the collar.

Officers of the staff may wear, under the same circumstances, the blue frock coat prescribed for them.

The sword-belt to be work over the frock coat.

The sash to be worn by general and staff officers, when in full dress, and on all occasions when serving with the troops, whether in undress or frock coat.

Colonels of regiments or corps, having the brevet rank of generals, may wear the uniform of their respective regiments or corps, or that of general officers according to their brevet rank, with the exception of the plume, which is to be worn only when commanding, according to their brevets. They will wear the plume of their respective corps.

All other brevet officers will wear the epaulettes distinctive of their highest rank according to their arm.

Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Dragoons.

The sash is to be worn on all occasions where the officer is in full dress.

The frock coat may be worn as a common morning dress in quarters and on certain duties off parade; to wit: at drills—inspections of barracks and hospitals—courts of inquiry and boards—inspections of articles and necessaries—working parties and fatigue duties—and upon the march; on all such occasions to be buttoned, and hooked at the collar.

The sword-belt is to be worn over the frock coat, and when the officer is engaged on duty of any description, except that of the stable, the sash is to be worn.

The swords of mounted officers will be suspended from the belt, by slings of the same materials as the belt, with a hook attached to the belt, to suspend the sword more conveniently when on foot.

Officers of regiments and posts will be provided with Shell jackets, to be worn in summer, during the extreme heat of the season; the shell jacket to be of the following pattern:—white cotton or linen, with standing collar; cuffs two and a half inches deep round the wrist, to open at the lower seam; where they will be buttoned with two small uniform buttons. A row of nine small uniform buttons down the front at equal distances; the front and rear of the jacket to come down in a peak. A similar jacket of light blue cloth may be worn in campaign, or on fatigue duty.

The commanding officer will determine in orders, when the shell jacket is to be worn by the officers and men, according to the state of the weather. On duty, the sash will be worn with the shell jacket.

General Remarks.

The hair to be short, or what is generally termed cropped; the whiskers not to extend below the lower tip of the ear, and a line thence with the curve of the mouth; moustaches will not be worn by officers or men on any pretense whatever.

Vests are not described, as they form no part of the military dress. When worn, however, by general or general staff officers, they may be of buff, blue, or white, to suit season and climate, with the small uniform button, and made with standing military collar; for regimental officers, the same, with the exception of the buff.

The forage cap may be worn with the frock coat and with the shell jacket; in winter, the forage cap, in cold climates, will have a temporary band of black fur, two and a half inches wide, attached to the bottom, to unite in front by a tie of black ribbon.

Regimental officers, not serving with their regiments, nor doing duty in the line, may wear cocked hats of the same description as those prescribed for the general staff officers, except that the loop will be of black silk gimp, the eagle yellow, the tassels to conform to the color of the button.

Cocked hats may be either open or formed so as to shut like the hat, which has heretofore been designated chapeau de bras.

All officers are permitted to wear a blue plain coat, with the button designating their respective corps or stations, without any other mark on them; such a coat, however, is not to be considered as a dress for any military purpose whatever.

When not on military duty, black scabbards with gilt mountings may be worn by officers whose service scabbards are of metal.

Uniform of the non-commissioned officers, musicians,
artificers, and privates, of the Artillery.

Sergeant major—the same as that established for the field officers, excepting that binding will be substituted for gold lace; the epaulettes to be of the same pattern as that of the subalterns, excepting that worsted bullion will be substituted for gold bullion; plume, red upright hackle,

twelve inches long; aiguillette on the left shoulder, of yellow worsted, with gilt tags.

Quartermaster sergeant—the same as the sergeant major, excepting that the plume will be of light blue.

Chief musician—the same as quartermaster sergeant, excepting that the coat will be of red cloth, with white linings and turnbacks; plume white.

Sergeants—coat to be of dark blue, single breasted, with one row of nine buttons, placed at equal distances; the skirts to extend within seven inches of the bend of the knee; the coat to conform to the pattern of the officers' coats in other respects, excepting that the cuff shall have three buttons and loops on the slash sleeve, to conform to that designated for a captain; the lace to be of worsted; two worsted epaulettes corresponding in pattern with those of a captain; first sergeant of companies to wear a red worsted sash; all sergeants to wear the red stripe on the blue mixture trousers, as designated for officers; same for the noncommissioned staff.

Corporals—same as sergeants, excepting that there will be but two buttons on the slash sleeve, conforming to the pattern of the sleeve for the subalterns; trousers same as sergeants, without the stripe; two epaulettes of the pattern for the subalterns, of the same materials as those of the sergeants.

Privates—the same as the corporals, excepting that instead of epaulettes, a strap will be worn on each shoulder, composed of the same materials and form of the epaulettes of the corporals, with pad, and half fringe.

Musicians—the same as the privates, excepting that the coat will be of red cloth, lined with white, turnbacks white; white plume, upright hackle, ten inches long.

The cap of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, to be of the same pattern as that designated for the officers.

The plumes of the sergeants, corporals, and privates, red worsted, eight inches long.

Uniform of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the Infantry.

The same as that for the artillery, excepting the facings and trimmings, which will be white; plume white.

Bands.

A band will wear the uniform of the regiment or corps to which it belongs.

The commanding officer may, at the expense of the corps, sanctioned by the council of administration, make such additions in ornaments as he may judge proper.

Note.—Non-commissioned officers and privates, as well as musicians, who shall have served faithfully for the term of five years, shall be permitted, as a mark of distinction, to wear a chevron on the sleeves of their coats, above the elbow, points up; and an additional chevron on each arm for every additional five years of faithful service. And those who served in the war, shall have the addition of a red stripe on each side of the chevron. 

 

1.  Although not authorized in the General Regulations for wear by Topographical Engineers, it is apparent that these "shoulder straps for Dragoons", called contra-epaulettes, were commonly worn by Topographical Engineers.  Two pairs of contra-epaulettes are known to exist.  The first pair belonged to Topographical Engineer George Hughes and is in the West Point Museum.  The second pair is privately owned and belonged to a major of Topographical Engineers.  The painting of Captain Linnard while on the staff of General Taylor, shows his wearing contra-epaulettes as does the photograph of Major James D. Graham.  Finally, a rather tenuous proof is suggested in a conversation in Emory's Notes of a Reconnaissance... a New Mexican woman points to Emory's "straps" and referring to General Armijo, says "anyone wearing these...".  General Armijo is normally pictured wearing  bullion fringed epaulettes.

The regulations of 1847 remained unchanged from 1841 for the Topographical Engineers.  For the Army, these regulations are important for they specify the uniform that was worn during the Mexican War.  Insofar as the Topographical Engineers are concerned, there were no great changes since the regulations of 1839 which established the uniform of the corps.  The only difference is one of omission.  The 1839 regulations specified the use of galloons on the sleeves to indicate rank.  This specification was absent in the regulations of 1841 and 1847.  Another change that is not obvious is a new saber.  The topogs were to carry a saber "of the same form as that prescribed for the dragoons, ...to correspond with the pattern to be deposited in the Topographical bureau. "  When the Corps was established, that saber was the light cavalry (dragoon) saber of 1833, and its topographical engineer counterpart was referred to as the Topographical Engineer Officer's Sword, pattern 1839.  In 1840, the dragoons were issued a new saber, popularly referred to as the "wristbreaker."  The Regulations of 1841 and 1847 continued to specify that the topog blade was to be of the same pattern as that of the dragoons, although the patterns that were to be deposited in the bureau either were not or have been lost.  Recently, however, photographs of James D. Graham have surfaced showing him with the 1840 dragoon-style blade.  If any readers are aware of topog blade patterns, please contact us. 
 

Uniform and Dress of the Army of the United States
Regulations of 1847

 

 ...Corps of Topographical Engineers

Coat – dark blue cloth, double-breasted, two parallel rows of buttons,. ten in each row, at equal distances; the distance between the rows four inches throughout, measuring from the centers or eyes of the buttons; standing collar, to meet with hooks and eyes, and to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it; square cuff, three and one-fourth inches deep; slashed flap on the skirt, of dark blue cloth, seven and one-fourth inches long, and three and one-tenth inches wide at the upper and lower edges, with three large buttons, one at each point; two large buttons at the waist; the skirt to extend within three and a half inches of the bend of the knee; the collar, cuffs, and skirt-facings, or turnbacks, to be of dark blue velvet; the collar, cuffs, and slashed skirt-flaps to be embroidered in gold, with oak-leaves and acorns, according to the designs in the Topographical bureau.

Epaulettes – according to rank, as described hereafter. Within the crescent, which will be solid and bright, a shield embroidered in gold, and below it the letters T.E.. in old English characters; the letters to be of silver for all grades, except the Majors, who will wear yellow letters, to form the contrast with their epaulette-straps of silver lace. The spread-eagle, of silver, to be worn by the Colonel only, is to be placed upon the epaulette-strap above the shield.

Buttons –,gilt, seven-eighths of an inch diameter in the extreme, convex, and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the letters T.E. in old English characters, occupying the other half; small buttons one-half inch diameter, device and form the same.

Hat, loop and cockade; tassels, stock or cravat, sword-knot, boots, gloves – the same as for officers of the General Staff; except that the button in front of the hat will be that of the corps.

Plume – black, of the same form and materials as for the General Staff.

Sash – crimson silk-net, with silk bullion fringe ends, to to twice round the waist, and to be tied on the right hip; the pendant part to extend uniformly one foot two inches below the tie.

Spurs – yellow metal, straight shank, to correspond with the design in the Topographical bureau.

Trousers – from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, with a gold stripe down the outer seam for full dress, one and three-fourths inch wide, to correspond with the pattern in the Topographical bureau; from the first of May until the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Sabre – of the same form as that prescribed for the dragoons; fish-skin gripe, bound with yellow wire; gilt hilt, of half basket form; bright steel scabbard, to correspond with the pattern to be deposited in the Topographical bureau.

Waist-belt – black, one and a half inch wide, like that of the dragoons.

Plate – gilt, elliptical, two inches in the shortest diameter; device, the eagle and shield of the United States, and the letters  U.S. in old English characters underneath, with the words CORPS OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS, in small Roman capitals, around the edge of the plate.

Frock coat – same as for the General staff; except that the buttons will be those of the corps, and ten in front. With the frock coat, or for undress, the stripes on the trousers will be of black silk and worsted lace, with oak leaf and acorn figure, and one and three-fourths inch wide.

Forage-cap – according to pattern in Clothing bureau.

Cloak – same as for the General Staff, except. the button; lining blue.

 


 


GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY, 1841

ARTICLE LXXV.

CORPS OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS.

877….The Chief of the Corps of Topographical-Engineers shall be stationed at Washington, and shall be charged with the superintendence of the duties of that department, and shall, under the direction of the Secretary of War, have the control of all officers and agents of that branch of service, in every thing in reference to their duties, and to the disbursement of public funds.  He shall, from time to time, make inspections of the various duties in execution under the officers of his department

878….The duties of the Corps shall consist, in surveys for the defence of the frontier, inland and Atlantic, and of positions for fortifications; in reconnoisances of the country through which an army has to pass, or in which it has to operate; in the examination of all routes of communication by land or by water, both for supplies and for military movements; in the construction of military roads and permanent bridges connected with them, and in the absence of an officer or officers of the Corps of Engineers; of military bridges, and of field-works, for the defence of encampments, fords, ferries, and bridges.  For which purposes, officers of the Corps of Topographical-Engineers shall always accompany armies in the field.

879....The charge of the construction of all civil works, authorized by acts of Congress, not specially assigned by law, to some other branch of the service.

880….When officers of the Corps are assigned to any military department, fort, garrison, or post, to troops, or an army in the field, as field engineers, in conformity with paragraph 879, a duplicate of their orders will be sent to the Commanding-officer thereof, to whom the officers of the Corps will apply for assistants, or for an escort, if either be necessary.  They will carry into effect the orders of the Commanding-officer in reference to their duties, in which are included those of selecting sites for encampments.

881….Officers not so assigned, but on special service under the immediate orders of the Bureau, will not be diverted from such service except in cases of public exigency; and when so diverted the officer of the Corps will immediately report the same to the Bureau, transmitting a copy of the orders he way have received.

882….When officers of the Corps in the execution of a specific duty shall be quartered with a military command, and are not placed specially under the orders of the Commanding-officer, they will, nevertheless, be considered entitled to all the courtesies and rights of their rank.

883….Information collected by officers of the Corps shall not be made public without the sanction of the War Department, and then it shall be done under the supervision of the Bureau of Topographical-Engineers.

884....When surveys are required by the Bureau of the Corps of Engineers for purposes of fortifications and permanent military defences, application will be made by that Bureau to the War Department, which application, if approved, will be referred to the Bureau of Topographical-Engineers to be carried into effect. 


 

First major change in the uniform, veering away from the highly formal uniforms of the 1840s and simplifying the uniform. 1851 Regulations

By 1857, the duties of the Corps of Topographical Engineers and the Corps of Engineers were published together in the Regulations.  The duties of the two Corps were published as Article XLV in 1857.  The forms peculiar to the branches were noted as being "furnished from the bureaus, unless otherwise directed, on requisition in May for a year's supply."  These are the same forms that had been used as early as 1838.  The General Regulations for the Army of 1861 and the revised edition of 1863 omitted the Article dealing with the two Corps completely.  The revised edition of 1863 notes in the table of contents that "The Regulations for Engineers are furnished to officers requiring them, by the Chief Engineer."  The wording reflects the reorganization of the topogs and engineers into one Corps in May of 1863, although the Article heading still mentions both Corps.

Article XLV of the General Regulations of the Army, 1857

 


 

 

REVISED

UNITED STATES

ARMY REGULATIONS.

OF

1861.

WITH AN APPENDIX

CONTAINING THE

CHANGES AND LAWS AFFECTING ARMY REGULATIONS AND

ARTICLES OF WAR TO JUNE 25, 1863.

ARTICLE LI.

 

UNIFORM, DRESS, AND HORSE EQUIPMENTS.

 

COAT.

 

For Commissioned Officers

 

1470. All officers shall wear a frock-coat of dark blue cloth, the skirt to extend from two-thirds to three-fourths of the distance from the top of the hip to the bent of the knee; single breasted for Captains and Lieutenants; double-breasted for all other grades.

1471. For a Major-General--two rows of buttons on the breast, nine in each row, placed by threes; the distance between each row, five and one-half inches at the top, and three and one-half inches at the bottom; standing-up collar, to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the bottom, and slope thence up and backward at an angle of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs two and one-half inches deep to go around the sleeves parallel with the lower edge, and to button with three small buttons at the under seam; pockets in the folds of the skirts, with one button at the hip, and one at the end of each pocket, making four buttons on the back and skirt of the coat, the hip button to range with the lowest buttons on the breast; collar and cuffs to be of dark blue velvet; lining of the coat black.

1472. For a Brigadier-General --the same for a Major-General, except that there will be only eight buttons in each row on the breast, placed in pairs.

1473. For A Colonel--the same as for a Major-General, except that there will be only seven buttons in each row on the breast, placed at equal distances; collar and cuffs of the same color and material as the coat.

1474. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--the same as for a Colonel.

1475. For a Major--the same as for a Colonel.

1476. For a Captain--the same as for a Colonel, except that there will be only one row of nine buttons on the breasts, placed at equal distances.

1477. For a First Lieutenant--the same as for a Captain.

1478. For a Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Captain.

1479. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Captain.

1480. For a Medical Cadet--the same as for a Brevet Second Lieutenant.

1481. A round jacket, according to pattern, of dark blue cloth, trimmed with scarlet, with the Russian shoulder-knot, the prescribed insignia of rank to be worked in silver in the center of the knot, may be worn on undress duty by officers of Light Artillery.

BUTTONS.

1488. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff--gilt, convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain border; large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch.

1489. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers--gilt, nine-tenths of an inch in exterior diameter, slightly convex; a raised bright rim, one-thirtieth of an inch wide; device, and eagle holding in his beak a scroll, with the word, "Essayons," a bastion with embrasures in the distance surrounded by water, with a rising sun--the figures to be of dead gold upon a bright field. Small buttons of the same form and device, and fifty-five hundredths of an inch in exterior diameter.

1490. For Officers of the Corps of Topographical Engineers--gilt, seven-eighths of an inch exterior diameter, convex and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the letters T.E. in old English character the other half, small buttons, one-half-inch diameter, device and form the same.

1491. For Officers of the Ordnance Department--gilt, convex, plain border, cross cannon and bombshell, with circular scroll over and across the cannon, containing the words "Ordnance Corps;" large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch.

1492. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Calvary--gilt, convex; device, a spread eagle with the letter A, for Artillery--I, for Infantry-- C, for Cavalry, on the shield; large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch.

1493. Aides-de-Camp may wear the button of the General Staff, or of their regiment or corps, at their option.

1494. For Medical Cadets--same as for Officers of the General Staff.

1495. For all Enlisted Men--yellow, the same as is used by the Artillery, &c., omitting the letter in the shield.

TROWSERS.

1496. For General Officers and Officers of the Ordnance Department--of dark blue cloth, plain, without stripe, welt, or cord down the outer seam.

1469. For Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps, except the Ordnance--dark blue cloth, with a gold cord, one-eighth of an inch in diameter, along the outer seam.

1470. For all Regimental Officers--dark blue cloth, with a welt let into the outer seam, one-eighth of an inch in diameter, of colors corresponding to the facings of the respective regiments, viz.: Cavalry, yellow; Artillery, scarlet; Infantry, sky-blue.

1471. For Medical Cadets--same as for Officers of the general Staff, except a welt of buff cloth, instead of a gold cord.

1472. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light Artillery--dark blue cloth; sergeants with a stripe one and one-half inch wide; corporals with a stripe one-half inch wide, of worsted lace, down and over the outer seam, of the color of the facings of the respective corps.

1473. Ordnance Sergeants and Hospital Stewards--stripe of crimson lace one and one-half inch wide.

1474. Privates--plain, without stripe or welt.

1503. For Companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery--sky-blue cloth.

All trowsers to be made loose, without plaits, and to spread well over the boot; to be re-enforced for all enlisted mounted men.

HAT.

1504. For Officers--of best black felt. The dimensions of medium size to be as follows:
Width of brim, 3-1/4 inches.
Height of crown, 6-1/4 inches.
Oval of tip, 1/2 inch.
Taper of crown, 3/4 inch.
Curve of head, 3/8 inch.
The binding to be 1/2 inch deep, of best black ribbed silk.

1505. For Enlisted Men--of black felt, same shape and size as for officers, with double row of stitching, instead of binding, around the edge. To agree in quality with the pattern deposited in the clothing arsenal.

1506. Medical Cadets will wear a forage cap according to pattern.

Trimmings.

1507. For General Officers--gold cord, with acorn-shaped ends. The brim of the hat looped up on the right side, and fastened with an eagle attached to the side of the hat; three black ostrich-feathers on the left side a gold-embroidered wreath in front, on black velvet ground, encircling the letters U.S. in silver, old English characters.

1508. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's, Subsistence, Medical and Pay Departments, and the Judge Advocate, above the rank of Captain--the same as for General Officers, except the cord, which will be of black silk and gold.

1509. For the same Departments, below the rank of Field Officers--the same as for Field Officers, except that there will be but two feathers.

1510. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered wreath of laurel and palm, encircling a silver turreted castle on black velvet ground.

1511. For Officers of the Topographical Engineers--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered wreath of oak leaves, encircling a gold-embroidered shield on black velvet ground.

1512. For Officers of the Ordnance Department--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered shell and flame, on black velvet ground.

1513. For Officers of Cavalry--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be two gold-embroidered sabres crossed, edges upward on black velvet ground with the number of the regiment in silver in the upper angle. 1514. For Officers of Artillery--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be gold-embroidered cross-cannon, on black velvet ground with the number of the regiment in silver at the intersection of the cross-cannon.

1515. For Officers of Infantry--the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered bugle, on black velvet ground with the number of the regiment in silver within the bend.

1516. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light Artillery--the same as for officers of the respective corps, except that there will be but one feather, the cord will be of worsted, of the same color as that of the facings of the corps, three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, running three times through a slide of the same material, and terminating with two tassels, not less than two inches long, on the side of the hat opposite the feather. The insignia of corps, in brass, in front of the hat, corresponding with those prescribed for officers, with the number of regiment, five-eighths of an inch long, in brass, and letter of company, one inch, in brass, arranged over the insignia.

1517. For Hospital Stewards the cord will be of buff and green mixed. The wreath in front of brass, with the letter U.S. in Roman, of white metal. Brim to be looped up to side of hat with a brass eagle, having a hook attached to the bottom to secure the brim-on the right side for mounted men and left side for foot men. The feather to be worn on the side opposite the loop.

1518. All the trimming of the hat are to be made so that they can be detached; but the eagle, badge of corps, and letter of company, are to be always worn.

1519. For companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery, the old pattern uniform cap, with red horsehair plume, cord and tassel.

1520. Officers of the General Staff, and Staff Corps, may wear, at their option, a light French chapeau, either still crown or flat, according to the pattern deposited in the Adjutant-General's office. Officers below the rank of field officers to wear but two feathers.

FORAGE CAPS.

1521. For fatigue purposes, forage caps, of pattern in the Quartermaster-General's office: dark blue cloth, with a welt of the same around the crown, and yellow metal letters in front to designate companies.

1522. Commissioned officers may wear forage caps of the same pattern, with the distinctive ornament of the corps and regiment in front.

CRAVAT OR STOCK.

1523. For all officers-black; when a cravat is worn, the tie to be visible at the opening if the collar.

1524. For all Enlisted Men-black; leather according to pattern.

BOOTS.

1525. For all officers-ankle or Jefferson

1526. For Enlisted Men of Cavalry and Light Artillery-ankle or Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern.

1527. For Enlisted Men of Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, and Ordnance-Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern.

SPURS.

1528. For all Mounted Officers-yellow metal, or gilt.

1529. For all Enlisted Mounted Men-yellow metal, according to pattern (see par. 1648.)

GLOVES.

1530. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps-buff or white.

1531. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, Cavalry, Dragoons, and Riflemen-white.

SASH.

1532. For General Officers-buff, silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twice around the waist, and to tie behind the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie.

1533. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers, Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, Artillery, Infantry and the Judge Advocate of the Army- crimson silk net; for Officers of the Medical Department-medium or emerald green silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; to go around the waist and tie as for General Officers.

1534. For all Sergeant Majors, Quartermaster Sergeants, Ordnance Sergeants, Hospital Stewards, First Sergeants, Principal or Chief Musicians and Chief Buglers-red worsted sash, with worsted bullion fringe ends; to go twice around the waist, and to tie hind the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie.

1535. The sash will be worn (over the coat) on all occasions of duty of every description, except stable and fatigue.

1536. The sash will be worn by "Officers of the Day" across the body, scarf fashion, from the right shoulder to the left side, instead of around the waist, tying behind the left hip as prescribed.

SWORD-BELT.

1537. For all Officers-a waist-belt not less than one and one-half inch nor more than two inches wide to be worn over the sash; the sword to be suspended from it by slings of the same material as the belt, with a hook attached to the belt upon which the sword may be hung.

1538. For General Officers-Russia leather, with three stripes of gold embroidery on both sides.

1539. For all other Officers-black leather plain.

1540. For all Non-commissioned Officers-black leather, plain.

SWORD-BELT PLATE.

1513. For all Officers and Enlisted Men-gilt, rectangular, two inches wide a raised bright rim; a silver wreath of laurel encircling the "Arms of the United States;" eagle, shield. Scroll, edge of cloud and ray bright. The motto, "E Pluribus Unum," in silver letters, upon the scroll; stars also of silver; according to pattern.

SWORD AND SCABBARD.

1542. For General Officers-straight sword, gilt hilt, silver grip brass or steel scabbard.

1543. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers, Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, Artillery, Infantry and the Judge Advocate of the Army, Aides-de-Camp, Field Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, and for the Light Artillery-the sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department, April 9, 1850; or the one described in General Orders No. 21, of August 28, 1860, for officers therein designated.

1544. For the Medical and Pay Departments- small sword and scabbard, according to pattern in the Surgeon-General's office.

1545. For Medical Cadets, the sword and belt and plate will be the same as for non-commissioned officers.

1546. For Officers of Cavalry-sabre and scabbard now in use, according to pattern in the Ordnance Department.

1547. For the Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Riflemen, except the field officers- the sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department April 9, 1850.

1548. The sword and sword-belt will be worn upon all occasions of duty, without exception.

1549. When on foot, the sabre will be suspended from the hook attached to the belt.

1550. When not on military duty, officers may wear swords of honor, or the prescribed sword, with a scabbard, gilt, or of leather with gilt mountings.

SWORD-KNOT.

1551. For General Officers--gold cord with acorn end.

1552. For all other officers--gold lace strap with gold bullion tassel.

 

BADGES TO DISTINGUISH RANK..

Epaulettes

1553. For the Major-General Commanding the Army--gold, with solid crescent; device, three silver-embroidered stars, one, one and a half inches in diameter, one and one-fourth inches in diameter, one, one and one-eighth inches in diameter, placed on the strap in a row, longitudinally, and equidistant, the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the top; dead and bright bullion, one-half inch in diameter and three and one-half inches long.

1554. For all other Major-Generals--the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the strap instead of three, omitting the smallest.

1555. For a Brigadier General--the same as for the Major-General, except that instead of two, there shall be one star (omitting the smallest) placed upon the strap, and not with the crescent.

1556. For a Colonel--the same as for a Brigadier General, substituting a silver-embroidered spread eagle for the star upon the strap; and within the crescent for the Medical Department--a laurel wreath embroidered in gold, and the letters M.S., in old English characters, in silver, within the wreath; Pay Department--same as the Medical Department, with the letters P.D., in old English characters, Corps of Engineers--a turreted castle of silver; Corps of Topographical Engineers- a shield embroidered on gold, and below it the letter T.E., in old English characters, in silver; Ordnance Department--shell and flame in silver embroidery; Regimental Officers--the number of the regiment embroidered in gold, within a circlet of embroidered silver, one and three-fourths inches in diameter, upon cloth of the following colors: for Artillery--scarlet; Infantry--light or sky blue; Cavalry--yellow.

1557. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, but substituting for the eagle a silver-embroidered leaf.

1558. For a Major--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle.

1559. For a Captain--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, except that the bullion will be only one-fourth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle two silver-embroidered bars.

1560. For a First Lieutenant--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, except that the bullion will be only one-eighth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle one silver-embroidered bars.

1561. For a Second Lieutenant--the same as for a First Lieutenant omitting the bar.

1562. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Second Lieutenant.

1563. All officers having military rank will wear an epaulette on each shoulder.

1564. The epaulette may be dispensed with when not on duty, and on certain duties off parade, to wit: at drills, at inspections of barracks and hospitals, on Courts of Inquiry and Boards, at inspections of articles and necessaries, on working parties and fatigue duties, and upon the march, except when, in war, there is immediate expectation of meeting the enemy, and also when the overcoat is worn.

Shoulder-Straps.

1565. For the Major-General Commanding the Army--dark blue cloth, one and three eighths inches wide by four inches long; bordered with an embroidery of gold one-fourth of an inch wide; three silver-embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side equidistant between the center and the outer edge of the strap; the centre star to be the largest.

1566. For all other Major-Generals--the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the strap instead of three, the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both star of the same size.

1567. For a Brigadier General--the same as for the Major-General, except that instead of two, there shall be one star instead of two; the centre of the star to be equidistant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of the strap .

1568. For a Colonel--the same as for a Major-General, and bordered in like manner with an embroidery of gold; a silver-embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap; two inches between the tips of the wings, having in its right talon an olive-branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast, as represented in the arms of the United States cloth of the strap as follows: For the General Staff and Staff Corps--dark blue; Artillery--scarlet; Infantry--light or sky blue; Cavalry--yellow.

1569. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, but omitting the eagle, and introducing a silver-embroidered leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap.

1570. For a Major--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a gold-embroidered leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap.

1571. For a Captain--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, and introducing at each end two gold-embroidered bars of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width.

1572. For a First Lieutenant--the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end one gold-embroidered bar of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width.

1573. For a Second Lieutenant--the same as for a the same as for a Colonel, according to corps omitting the eagle.

1574. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant--the same as for a Second Lieutenant.

1575. For a Medical Cadet--a strip of gold lace three inches long, half an inch wide, placed in the middle of a strap of green cloth three and three-quarter inches long by one and one-quarter inches wide.

1576. The shoulder-strap will be worn whenever the epaulette is not.

OVERCOAT.

For Commissioned Officers.

1587. A "cloak coat" of dark blue cloth, closing by means of four frog buttons of black silk and loops of black silk cord down the breast, and at the throat by a long loop á échelle, without tassel or plate, on the left side, and a black silk frog button on the right; cord for the loops fifteen-hundredths of an inch in diameter; back, a single piece, slit up from the bottom, from fifteen to seventeen inches, according to the height of the wearer, and closing at will, by buttons, and button-holes cut in a concealed flap; collar of the same material as the coat, rounded at the edges, and to stand or fall; when standing, to be about five inches high; sleeves loose, of a single piece, and round at the bottom, without cuff or slit; lining, woolen around the front and lower border, the edges of the pockets, the edges of the sleeves, collar, and slit in the back, a flat braid of black silk one-half inch wide; and around each frog button on the breast, a knot two and one-quarter inches in diameter of black silk cord, seven-hundredths of an inch in diameter, arranges according to drawing; cape of the same color and material as the coat, removable at the pleasure of the wearer, and reaching to the cuff of he coat-sleeve when the arm is extended; coat to extend down the leg from six to eight inches below the knee, according to height. To indicate rank, there will be on both sleeves, near the lower edge, a knot of black silk braid not exceeding one-eighth of an inch in width, arranged according to drawing, and composed as follows:

1588. For a General--of five braids, double knot.

1589. For a Colonel--of five braids, single knot.

1590. For a Lieutenant-Colonel--of four braids, single knot.

1591. For a Major--if three braids, single knot.

1592. For a Captain--of two braids, single knot.

1593. For a First Lieutenant--of one braid, single knot.

1594. For a Second Lieutenant and Brevet Second Lieutenant--a plain sleeve, without knot or ornament.

 

MISCELLANEOUS.

1628. General Officers, and Colonels having the brevet rank of General Officers, may, on occasions of ceremony, and when not serving with troops, wear the "dress" and "undress" prescribed by existing regulations.

1629. Officers below the grade of Colonel having brevet rank, will wear the epaulettes and shoulder-straps distinctive of their army rank. In all other respects, their uniform and dress will be that of their respective regiments, corps or departments, and according to their commissions in the same. Officers above the grade of Lieutenant-Colonel by ordinary commission, having brevet rank, may wear the uniform of their respective regiments or corps, or that of General Officers, according to their brevet rank.

1630. The uniform and dress of the Signal Officer will be that of a Major of the General Staff.

1631. Officers are permitted to wear a plain dark blue body-coat, with the button designating their respective corps, regiments, or departments, without any other mark or ornament upon it. Such a coat, however, is not to be considered as a dress for any military purpose.

1632. In like manner, officers are permitted to wear a buff, white, or blue vest, with the small button of their corps, regiment, or department.

1633. Officers serving with mounted troops are allowed to wear, for stable duty. A plain dark blue cloth jacket, with one or two rows of buttons down the front, according to rank; stand-up collar, sloped in front as that of the uniform coat; shoulder-straps according to rank, but no other ornament.

1634. The hair to be short; the beard to be worn at the pleasure of the individual; but, when worn, to be kept short and neatly trimmed.

1635. A Band will wear the uniform of the regiment or corps to which it belongs. The commanding officer may, at the expense of the corps, sanctioned by the Council of Administration, make such additions in ornaments as he may judge proper.

 

UNIFORM.

130. In time of actual field service, officers of Cavalry, Artillery, and Infantry are permitted to wear the light blue overcoat prescribed for enlisted men of the mounted corps.

131. The uniform for Chaplains of the Army will be plain black frock coat with standing collar, and one row of nine black buttons; plain black pantaloons; black felt hat, or army forage cap, without ornament. On occasions of ceremony, a plain chapeau de bras may be worn.

132. The following change is made in the uniform trowsers of regimental officers and enlisted men: The cloth to be sky-blue mixture. The welt for officers, and stripes for non-commissioned officers of Infantry, to be of dark blue.

133. The following uniform has been adopted for the Invalid Corps:
Jacket-
Of sky-blue kersey, with dark-blue trimmings, cut like the jacket for United States cavalry, to come well down on the loins and abdomen.
Trowsers
-Present regulation, sky-blue,
Forage Cap
-Present regulation.

134. The following uniform- has been adopted for officers of the Invalid Corps:
Frock Coat
-Of sky-blue cloth, with dark-blue velvet collar and cuffs-in all other respects, according to the present pattern for officers of Infantry.
Shoulder Straps
-According to present regulations, but worked on dark-blue velvet.
Pantaloons
-Of sky-blue cloth, with double stripe of dark-blue Cloth down the outer seam, each stripe one-half inch wide, with space between of three-eighths of an inch.

Revised United States Army regulations of 1861, with an appendix containing the changed and laws affecting Army regulations and Articles of war to June 25, 1863., United States. War Dept.

 

 

 

Article XLVI of the General Regulations of the Army, 1863

 

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